Beauty and Brains

Once you start reading on art and graphic design, you get (other people’s) perceptions of what is beautiful and what isn’t visually attractive. Is a design successful when it’s so mind-challenging to a point that makes us feel stupid for not getting it at a first glance or the exact opposite, when it fits so perfectly with everything else it goes so easily into our minds?

I take it as a little bit of both. While the simpler the design the longer it will live, it’s refreshing to see a clever design becomes popular, and usually those have one kind or another of an ‘aha!’ factor. Gestalt principles of perceptions are a great intro to how these factors can be defined.

The human mind can see more than the sum of parts to make a shape. Sometimes it adds parts on its own to complete a figure that doesn’t really have a meaning otherwise. For example, you can understand that the below logo is a panda, even though it really isn’t, your mind completed the missing parts in order to see it that way.

panda

Same goes for grouping things together based on shapes, line weights, colors or other features. Things are perceived in a way that makes the most sense using this amazing default brain power.

Other examples of Gestalt:

g4

g2 g1 g3

Thirty Conversations On Design

30 designers; two questions:

1- What design inspires you the most?

2- What problems do you think design can solve?

Designers take on answering the questions in short videos which you can see them all here, some agree on transportation as a problem design should start revolutionizing by now. Be it the mapping aspect of it or many of its tedious processes, like long security check lines at the airport.

Personally, I don’t think it needs to be this totally impressive new feature to design a solution, the simplest forms of design are the ones that outlive everything else to the point that challenges people to remember the original problem years later.

John Militello who happens to be the Creative Innovation Team Manager at Google (as well as sitting too close to the camera to the point where we only see half of his nose, talk about the design mind!) also mentions the different transportation system as a problem to solve. However, he says that we don’t necessarily need to reinvent the wheel. Inspiration can be in everything; nature, a pen, a spoon….anything!

Kit Hinrichs on the other hand is inspired the most by typography. Agustin Garza by a centuries-old piece from Central America because it combines the elements of meaning and aesthetic design. Juke box coins, a rubber band ball, an eraser, the Internet are few of the answers the designers provided.

These types of answers is what makes it interesting to get designers’ perspective on design. Since design is the most successful when it’s not noticed, it’s hard to answer such questions as a viewer. If you remember a design, it’s either because you really loved it or you really hated it, the in-betweens are what we see everyday, and what could be inspiring us everyday without us ever noticing, and that’s the beauty of it.

“I Put Words in People’s Mouths”: The Remix Culture and Copyright Claims

If your 2012 revolved around trying to get Call Me Maybe out of your head, you’re about to be reminded of how catchy this song was. Being good or bad isn’t even relevant at this point, the song was everywhere and so were an endless stream of parodies.

What allowed these parodies to survive is the “fair use” argument against the artist/label’s copyrights, they were commentaries on the song and in my opinion did more promotion than the label could have ever done on its own.

Parodies aside, one YouTube channel did a remix of the song with Obama’s real speeches. Real as in his voice is actually his voice, even though he may have not said “ripped jeans skin was showing”. Let’s watch:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hX1YVzdnpEc]

Baracksdubs is a YouTube channel that is dedicated to creating remixes of presidential speeches to voice and mouth lyrics of pop songs, sometimes you’d find Joe Biden or Hillary Clinton featured in a couple of videos but they’re primarily Obama. The creator of this channel, Fadi Saleh, goes through what must be hundreds of these speeches looking for words, parts of words and sometimes potential parts of words to create his collages. What he creates is this whole new production that doesn’t really relate to neither the song nor to Obama.

Wouldn’t there be at least 4 big-picture copyright, at least brow-furrowing cases here?

The answer is: No.

Baracksdubs started around three years ago, and giving that it still exists and creates new content gives more weight to what Lessig is calling for in the book Remix; a breathing room in copyright regulations sets our culture for more creativity.

For the example above, Carly Rae Jepsen herself faced copyright infringement claims herself so it might even be difficult to pinpoint what an “original content” is here. As for the Obama side, Baracksdubs actually celebrated with a Facebook post sharing an article in which Obama was asked about the Call Me Maybe clip, to which he replied:

“I have to admit, I’ve never actually heard the original version of the song. I saw this version where they spliced up me from a whole bunch of different speeches that I made. They kind of mashed together an Obama version of it.”

“An Obama version”!

it went on to create a brand for itself, media kept up with new releases like original music. In a way, he created a stand-alone brand from mashing two things up in a creative and intriguingly accurate way that will probably open doors to even more versions of content.

Here’s a couple more for fun:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6PEboTpcfI]

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mw0v-7CfLvc]

“Inspired”…Sure

There comes a time in every creative person’s life when they start making professional work, and usually right before that is when they get an important sentence repeatedly knocked into them by their bosses, contracts or lawyers: Don’t Steal Other People’s Work.

Don’t copy and paste, don’t rephrase or reshape, don’t even think about any other type of similar work while you’re working. It doesn’t matter if you mean to or not, your life as a creator will be over if you even come close to it.

But the question is: is this possible?

Scenario A: A designer is quickly approaching a deadline to hand in a banner and inspiration just doesn’t want to make an appearance. Our designer goes online, searched for similar banners to what he’s doing and tweak somethings and goes to sleep happy.

Someone finds out or recognize the original work and bam; our designer is in deep trouble.

Scenario B: A designer is working on a banner design. He has an idea, tries it and is instantly happy with his work, he knows it’s going to be a hit. It just feels right.

Someone recognizes that his work is a copy of a 1980 ad and bam; our designer is in deep trouble.

Are they both plagiarists?

The argument is a tough one, designer B is being a human being with a memory that works, that’s all he did wrong. Isn’t that what brains supposed to do? absorb information and recall them when needed? He stored something he glanced at years ago and recalled it when he was looking for idea, same goes for music, books, stories,,,etc

But then again, a work that isn’t originally the artist’s is a work stolen. You wouldn’t want to see another version of something you created attributed to someone else. And there’s no way of knowing if the person actually intended to copy or not.

In that way Michael Bierut makes sense of calling himself a plagiarist, and consequently we all are. We are plagiarists for dressing the way we dress and for writing the things we write and for saying “this sick beat” (It’s copyrighted by Taylor Swift. True story).

As someone who writes for a living, this thought scares me. And now I’m looking for software to validate that any words I type (or ideas?) is a brand new invention that no one in the entire world, since the beginning of time has reached before me. Because I can’t afford being sued!