Thirty Conversations On Design

30 designers; two questions:

1- What design inspires you the most?

2- What problems do you think design can solve?

Designers take on answering the questions in short videos which you can see them all here, some agree on transportation as a problem design should start revolutionizing by now. Be it the mapping aspect of it or many of its tedious processes, like long security check lines at the airport.

Personally, I don’t think it needs to be this totally impressive new feature to design a solution, the simplest forms of design are the ones that outlive everything else to the point that challenges people to remember the original problem years later.

John Militello who happens to be the Creative Innovation Team Manager at Google (as well as sitting too close to the camera to the point where we only see half of his nose, talk about the design mind!) also mentions the different transportation system as a problem to solve. However, he says that we don’t necessarily need to reinvent the wheel. Inspiration can be in everything; nature, a pen, a spoon….anything!

Kit Hinrichs on the other hand is inspired the most by typography. Agustin Garza by a centuries-old piece from Central America because it combines the elements of meaning and aesthetic design. Juke box coins, a rubber band ball, an eraser, the Internet are few of the answers the designers provided.

These types of answers is what makes it interesting to get designers’ perspective on design. Since design is the most successful when it’s not noticed, it’s hard to answer such questions as a viewer. If you remember a design, it’s either because you really loved it or you really hated it, the in-betweens are what we see everyday, and what could be inspiring us everyday without us ever noticing, and that’s the beauty of it.

Examples of Capturing Visual Data

Data analysts are those magical people who can read numbers in a way other people can’t. Or at least that’s how I see them as someone who used to work in a place where we heavily depended on data. As an editor, the data analyst would direct me to where I should focus more, and where the website is supposed to be headed and why.

But ask a data analyst how they do it and you probably won’t get a bunch of unrelated numbers, you would get a chart. If they’re creative enough, you can get some visual that explains what’s happening and what needs to happen without them ever saying a word.

Data visualization allows everyone to make sense of something, and to put several levels of data in a form that makes it interpretable. It’s as important as knowing the numbers, if I list every metric you need yo know and left, you would know the numbers, you’d have the data, but you wouldn’t know what to do with it. Visualizing it is more practical and more fun.

Below are some of my favorite data visualizing techniques I’ve seen so far:

1- The Life of a Typical American: By Tim Urban

If a person lives up to 90 years old, this is what their life will most likely look like in weeks, based on the average timing of major life events in the life of an ordinary American.

Seeing this info organized like that makes it more understandable, it establishes a main ground for other structures to be built.

life

2- The Middle East (good luck getting that one!)

David McCandless and UniversLab

And yet there are graphs that puts it into perspective how complicated something is, this one represents some kind of results obviously, but it is striving for a bigger point rather than inviting you to grab a pencil and follow the lines. (You can if you really want to)

mideast

3- Music Visualized

This is what music looks like. The lines moving from the center away represents the musical channel as it moves with time, different angles of the lines represent different frequencies. “The purpose was to create even more an aesthetically responding visualization with the music as an artist.” as the creator puts it.

bet

queen

This one shows us how great minds don’t actually think alike: 

greatminds

Imagine if I used this post to list all the data you learned about here in bullet point. wouldn’t be as attention-grabbing, would it?

Why Is That Art and Why Should I Care?

Studying art is not an easy task to define, mostly because most people think being an artist has more to do with talent than school and books. Being talented is important, but then again there are millions of talented people around the world, how can any of them set themselves apart by studying art?

When you exert a big amount of effort into knowing more about something, you simply accumulate an advantage over someone who doesn’t.

This applies on the arts as well. While you can’t read a book and suddenly become an artist, knowing the basics of the industry, the history, what other artists already tried, how they think, and how people react, all adds up to your knowledge on the subject and feeds this advantage that most certainly will show in the work.

daliThe book 1st Why Is That Art by weg Terry Barrett discusses of four main areas of art; realism, expressionism, formalism, and postmodern pluralism. As a student in the iMedia program, I’m interested in art as an application tool, and design is something wholesale jerseys I want to pursue further in the professional world. But why Showroom do I have to learn about postmodern pluralism in 2015?

The answer is in what this book offers of information that goes into the foundation of how I think of art and design. Learning the very old basics of a profession in the digital world is not an oxymoron, because we rely on the value of these teachings to innovate new things.

We have amazing technologies at our service today but we are missing an advantage older generations had; learning in a linear way, starting from the very basics and going up on the difficulty scale of developed skills. We start from an advanced level of application because it’s available and so accessible to us we don’t even think about it. We don’t think how a photograph is made, we don’t have to go into a darkroom and spend time developing a picture, we can take ten pictures in one second and they are just there for us to use.

Knowing the basics thus reconnects us with this missing link. Personally, reading about the philosophies of important figures in the art world inspires me to think differently and opens this new perspective of how I view their work. It’s a basic foundations every artist needs to be aware of to build on further skills. Acquiring knowledge about what interests me in art isn’t technically difficult, the web is full of resources of articles and books taking an in-depth look through history and application on many subjects such as realism. It might be more challenging to know what to search for, how to start finding information, and filtering what is related to a specific area out of the sea of text and pictures.

This can be done by starting with the very basic information; a definition, available examples of works, and further suggested readings.

Being aware of art as an industry, as a philosophy, even as a business, feeds into my interest in design. As available as technologies have become to create such designs, it also facilitates the learning process of such art.